Impact of the Guided Self-Determination intervention among adolescents with co-existing ADHD and medical disorder: A mixed methods study

Helle Enggaard, Britt Laugesen, Melissa DeJonckheere, Mike Fetters, Martin K Dalsgaard, Marlene Briciet Lauritsen, Vibeke Zoffmann, Rikke Jørgensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Adolescents with ADHD are at increased risk of having a co-existing medical disorder. Research shows that having co-existing ADHD and a medical disorder interferes with the adolescents’ daily life, creating a dual task that cannot be managed as two independent disorders. Interventions to support adolescents in managing the dual task of living with co-existing ADHD and medical disorder are needed. The Guided-Self-Determination intervention might be suitable for this population, as it is an empowerment-based intervention facilitating patient involvement and self-management of a disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the Guided Self-Determination intervention impacted 10 adolescents with ADHD and a co-existing medical disorder. The study used a convergent mixed methods design. Quantitative data measuring support from nurses, support from parents, and self-management were collected though self-reported questionnaires at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months and were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Qualitative data capturing the adolescents’ experiences of the intervention and the intervention’s impact on support from nurses, parents, and self-management were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed thematically. Results of the quantitative and qualitative analyses were integrated in a mixed methods analysis. The integrated results suggest that this intervention may improve adolescents’ management of the difficulties of living with co-existing ADHD and a medical disorder, and that self-insight and nurse support are prerequisites for developing self-management strategies. However, the results showed that the intervention did not impact parental support. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of the intervention on a larger scale.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume42
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)87-98
Number of pages12
ISSN0161-2840
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • research designs, theory and method
  • health, nutrition and quality of life
  • children and youth

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