“It Is a Full-time Job to Be Ill”: Patient Work Involved in Attending Formal Diabetes Care Among Socially Vulnerable Danish Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Sofie Rogvi, Ann Dorrit Guassora, Nina Tvistholm, Gitte Wind, Ulla Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has shown social inequality in type 2 diabetes prevalence and that socially vulnerable type 2 diabetes patients benefit less than average from health services. Based on ethnographic fieldwork carried out between February 2017 and March 2018 in a Danish specialized outpatient clinic, this article focuses on patient work among socially vulnerable type 2 diabetes patients. Through attending to the border zone between formal health care and self-care, we show that patients do a lot of work requiring skills, resources, and initiative, to access and benefit from formal care. This work is complex and implicit in the organization of care. Patients’ social situations, especially their employment situation, complicate getting patient work done. Attending to patient work and implicit tasks in care organization may help us to see how social inequality in type 2 diabetes outcomes develops, and may be combated.

Original languageEnglish
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume31
Issue number14
Pages (from-to)2629–2640
Number of pages12
ISSN1049-7323
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • disease, health science and nursing
  • Denmark
  • access to care
  • ethnography
  • patient work
  • qualitative
  • self-care
  • socially vulnerable patients
  • type 2 diabetes care

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '“It Is a Full-time Job to Be Ill”: Patient Work Involved in Attending Formal Diabetes Care Among Socially Vulnerable Danish Type 2 Diabetes Patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this