TOTAL HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY: ACCOMPANYING RELATIVES´ ROLE IN SUPPORTING PATIENTS TO COMPLY WITH THE NEED FOR ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN ACCELERATED INTERVENTION PROGRAMS

Bodil Rasmussen (Other), Birte Hedegaard Larsen (Other)

Research output: ThesisMasterCommunication

Abstract

Abstract
The accelerated intervention program is expanding care principles in contemporary nursing practice in Denmark. Accelerated interventions reduce morbidity and length of stay by improved rehabilitation. The active participation of the patient is pivotal in accelerated interventions because it reduces anxiety and increases patient motivation. Policies and clinical guidelines focus on active participation of both patients and relatives in order to increase the quality of healthcare. In light of increasing demands of patients and relatives´ active participation research is needed about experiences.
This study explores patients´ experiences of support from accompanying relatives in meeting the requirement of active participation in an accelerated intervention program when undergoing total hip or knee replacement surgery. The participants and their accompanying relatives were hospitalised at a patient hotel.
A qualitative approach was applied to explore the patients´ experiences. Edmund Husserl´s philosophy of phenomenology was used as inspiration for the research approach applied. Five participants attended a semi-structured interview and a follow-up interview, each. The analysis was conducted under the inspiration of Amedeo Giorgi´s descriptive phenomenology. The analysis revealed four themes: 1) Post-operative experiences, 2) Feeling safe, 3) Accompanying relatives´ role in remembering and understanding information; and 4) Preferred support from accompanying relatives, when possible.
The main findings related to the challenges of managing post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting which limited active participation and were associated with a dilemma for the patients. The patients wanted to be active but were limited due to pain, nausea and vomiting. Support from the accompanying relatives was limited to their presence, reminding the participants to take the tablets and calling for help when pain became worse.
The presence of accompanying relatives was significant to support the patients’ feeling of safety before, during and after hospitalisation. The presence and support of accompanying relatives was recommended by all participants, and was identified as an influential factor in connection with contact to healthcare professionals.
The study findings have implications for clinical practice and research. Further research is suggested to establish more robust knowledge and attitudes towards the participation of accompanying relatives; and evidence-based guidelines for nursing practice.
Original languageDanish
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2012

Keywords

  • patients
  • next of kin

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